Syllabus for Relocating Science - Relocating Knowledge

Relocating Science - Relocating Knowledge

  • 7.5 credits
  • Course code: 5LH391
  • Education cycle: Second cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: History of Science and Ideas A1N

    Main field(s) of study and in-depth level

    The code indicates the education cycle and in-depth level of the course in relation to other courses within the same main field of study according to the requirements for general degrees:

    First cycle
    G1N: has only upper-secondary level entry requirements
    G1F: has less than 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G1E: contains specially designed degree project for Higher Education Diploma
    G2F: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G2E: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements, contains degree project for Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
    GXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

    Second cycle
    A1N: has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1F: has second-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (60 credits)
    A2E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (120 credits)
    AXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G), Pass with distinction (VG)
  • Established: 2008-10-13
  • Established by: The Department Board
  • Revised: 2010-09-13
  • Revised by: The Department Board
  • Applies from: week 50, 2010
  • Entry requirements: For admittance to the course one is required to be accepted to the Master of Humanities programme or to have a corresponding competence
  • Responsible department: Department of History of Science and Ideas

Decisions and guidelines

The Department of History of Science and Ideas is responsible for the course

Learning outcomes

The students will
- understand the meaning and overall importance of demarcating science from knowledge
- learn that this process of delineating the boundaries between modern science and knowledge is part of a long historical process in which political, cultural and economic transformations on a global scale took place
- acquire an understanding of important historical and epistemological conditions which gave rise to and shape this modern science
- understand that the establishment of science as a most authoritative form of knowing is deeply entangled with the historical process of socially distinguishing between those who work with their hands and those who work with their heads
- learn that it is equally entangled with the construction of the cultural divide between the scientific “West and the Rest”

Content

What is it that we call “science”? What do we want to do in distinguishing it from “knowledge”? The conventional answer has held mathematics and physics to epitomise modern science, relegating most other subjects and intellectual activities to the domain of “knowledge”. However, in the past decades, at the same time as they have undermined the traditional understanding of its practice, many scholars have also revisited the content of modern science thereby blurring the traditional frontiers between “science” and “knowledge”. Furthermore, they remind us that originally the terms episteme, scientia, scienza, science, Wissenschaft, meant knowledge or skill in general.
This course will focus on a historical period — from the 18th to the mid-19th centuries — of political, cultural and economic transformations on a global scale in which the very boundaries between modern science and knowledge were being delineated, the former denoting a more authoritative form of knowledge, safely demarcated from “ordinary knowledge”. This linguistic divide is often also mirrored both by a social distinction between those who work with their heads and those who work with their hands and a cultural divide between the scientific “West and the Rest”. The age of Enlightenment thus provides a critical period for exploring the fruitful and reciprocal interactions between science and other forms of knowledge. We shall thus examine this cultural process of the creation of these distinctions and its effect on the establishment of the exact sciences, a question of great current importance when the latter are losing their pride of place to other disciplines and this map is again being contested and redrawn.

Instruction

The course will consist of lectures and seminars

Assessment

Examination will include active participation in seminars, writing
and defending papers, organising and convening a seminar. Grades will
be given according to the Swedish grading system and the ECTS grading
system. The following grades will be used: Väl godkänd VG (corresponds
to A and B), Godkänd G (corresponds to C,D or E), Underkänd U (corresponds
to Fx or F)

Other directives

Competences:
The students will
- acquire a critical awareness of the reciprocal interactions between science and other forms of knowledge past and present
- obtaining skills of judging the current process of globalisation of knowledge and its consequences
- learn that history of science is a field which can contribute to a better judgement of these actual processes

Syllabus Revisions

Reading list

The reading list is missing. For further information, please contact the responsible department.